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Prepare, Practice, Persist: How To Prepare

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Prepare, Practice, Persist: How To PrepareSince Chris Brogan posted about defining three words for 2012 as a “resolution,” rather than the more ubiquitous “I’m gonna lose X pounds, make more money, and win at life”-type resolutions (not knocking those, by the way–just noticing that for me, they don’t work very well…), I’ve declared my own “three words” to be Prepare, Practice, and Persist (also keeping in line with my love for alliteration).

My earlier post explained the why for me; this post will actually start talking about how I’m implementing them. If you don’t know, I’ve recently written a book–a novel, basically a thriller/suspense in the same vein as James Rollins, J.A. Konrath, and Jeremy Robinson. Check out more about the project here and here.

As such, I thought these words fit right in with what I hope to accomplish in 2012, and this post will explain some of that. Hopefully, you’ll be able to get something out of it as well. 

Goals, Dreams, and Tasks

There goals, then there Goals. Some are big, like dreams, and some are small. I choose to define them based on their size as tasks, goals, and dreams. One can get you to the other, but most likely it’ll take numerous “smaller” pieces to get you to a “larger” piece. Here’s what I mean.

  1. Tasks. Things that we may find mundane, like checking social media sites, analytics reports, or even posting on the blog.
  2. Goals. Things that we hope to accomplish, and could actually be pretty feasible for us within a reasonably short amount of time. Writing (and finishing!) a book, launching a business, and getting married could fall into this category.
  3. Dreams. These are the big ones: the goals that are astronomically awesome, yet still possible. Getting a great publishing deal, or earning enough on the side to quit your day job are dreams.
So, take your goals (small “g”) and split them up: small, big, or HUGE? Those are your Tasks, Goals, and Dreams.
Still with me?
Good. I did that, and realized three things:
  • Lots of little Tasks make it possible to achieve bigger Goals
  • Even more little Tasks make it possible to reach and achieve our Dreams
  • While super-easy, we don’t always want to do the little Tasks
For me, one Dream is: make enough money with my writing that I don’t have to work anywhere else. I’ll be free to travel, hang out, and learn about stuff I want to learn about.
The Goals are: Finish some books, get them into the market, sell quite a few copies of each, rinse and repeat.
The Tasks, therefore, are: Write every day, keep focusing on getting my work in front of readers, connect with possible readers, write even more.
How I’m Preparing
“Great,” you say. “How does that all play into your three words?”
Well, I need to prepare quite a bit this year if I even hope to achieve some of these goals. I need to make sure I hold true to my word and make the time to write every day, without exception. I need to make sure I’m keeping people up-to-date with my progress, either by picking up the phone, sending emails, or connecting on social media. They care enough to want updates–shouldn’t I care enough to provide them?
Finally, (or firstly…) I need to prepare my mind. If I’m ready to tackle the mundane; do the due diligence, I can’t expect to get anything done. If I’m not okay with the idea that writing takes, well, a lot of writing, I’ve shot myself in the foot. Sometimes, it just means having more willpower. Other times, it takes prayer, concentration, and setting incentives along the way.
Preparation is so important and sometimes inherently built-in to what we do every day that I almost considered (against my strong desire to be alliterative!) to not include it. “It’s a given!” I found myself saying. But truthfully, I believe that specifically and purposefully trying to prepare will only help us prepare.
Profound, I know, but it’s true: if we plan to prepare, we’ll be pretty powerfully prepared.
Sorry for that…
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